Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Diabetic Wound Healing: a Promising Therapeutic Modality

CellR4 2014; 2 (6): e1309

  Topic: Stem cell     Category:

Abstract

Wound healing is a complex process resulting in restoration of the structural integrity and functionality of injured tissue. Any disruption or delay in this process results in a chronic wound, which is a challenge to treat even with currently available therapy. Diabetic foot ulcers are a prime example of difficult-to-treat wounds. Despite the millions of dollars spent annually on ulcer management, individuals with diabetes are still at risk for amputations and ulcer recurrence. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been investigated as a means to aid the wound healing process. These cells function in a paracrine manner, stimulating surrounding cells and promoting angiogenesis. The studies reviewed highlight the benefit of ADSCs in chronic wounds in both animal models as well as in humans. Research on ADSC in chronic wounds is still in its infancy. Further studies are required to understand their exact mechanism of action, their potential utility in diabetic wounds, and to confirm their safety and efficacy in before this promising therapeutic can be translated to large-scale human therapy

To cite this article

Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Diabetic Wound Healing: a Promising Therapeutic Modality

CellR4 2014; 2 (6): e1309

Publication History

Published online: 04 Dec 2014